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  • Lets play a little trivia

    Im going to give you guys the chance at some tackle with some trivia. The winner gets to play for whats in the hatch. The hatch of my kayak is quite spacious - it could hold a lot of new tackle, or it could hold my electric bill... Be the first to get the trivia question right, and you get to check out whats in the hatch. I will give some hints along the way, first to guess right is the winner.

    First up is a "place" in Virginia.

    First hint - This land was originally purchased for its timber and commerce potential and was timbered over the span of 200 years.

    Attached Files

  • #2
    Neabsco Virginia. Timber was used to provide the Iron Smelters, which Va was famous for. Falling Creek where it enters the James was the first Iron Ore smelter (1620-22) in the USA.
    cheers,
    Steve

    2011/2013 St Jude's Charity Tournament Champion
    Bass East Big Bass Challenge winner of 11-12 and 12-1 hours.

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    • #3
      Jamestown?
      Rodney

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      • #4
        Incorrect on both, hint #2

        Timber harvest began in the late 1700's and the final tract of timber was last removed in the mid 1900's. There is a body of water on the property that contains tannic acids from juniper and cypress trees. The water was used on ships in the 1700s as the tannic acid would prevent bacteria from growing.

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        • #5
          Providence Forge
          2013 Frog Only Tournament Winner
          2010 Tie for VA-Outdoors Angler of the Year
          2009 Caroline County Rotary Club Tournament Winner
          2007 Tuesday Night Classic Champions
          "Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after."
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          • #6
            Originally posted by dirtman View Post
            Providence Forge
            No sir, but closer

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            • #7
              Dismal Swamp
              Make VAO Great again

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PsuHntr View Post
                Dismal Swamp
                Winner winner chicken dinner - how did you figure it out? When I get home, I will open the hatch and see what you have won Aball

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                • #9
                  you got my address ;)
                  Make VAO Great again

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                  • #10
                    The Great Dismal Swamp is a geological wonder. For millions of years before the Swamp was formed, it was under the sea. It is viewed by naturalists and other scientists as one of the best outdoor laboratories in the world! This natural treasure emerged as a landform when the Continental Shelf made its last significant shift.

                    William Byrd II by Hans Hysing Virginia Historical Society

                    Just who discovered the Great Dismal and when is unknown. Colonel William Byrd II was a member of the commission that surveyed the North Carolina/Virginia state line through the Swamp in 1728 and provided the first extensive description of it. Colonel Byrd first suggested draining the swamp and digging a north-south canal through it to connect the waters of Chesapeake Bay in Virginia and Albemarle Sound in North Carolina. In May 1763, George Washington made his first visit to the Swamp and joined with several other prominent Virginians and North Carolinians to form two syndicates known as the Dismal Swamp Land Company and the Adventurers for Draining the Great Dismal Swamp. This group hoped to drain the Swamp, harvest the trees, and use the land for farming.

                    The company purchased 40,000 acres of Swamp land for $20,000 in 1763. Washington directed the surveying and digging of the 5-mile long ditch from the western edge of the Swamp to Lake Drummond, known today as Washington Ditch. In the late 1700s, Riddick Ditch was completed. Together these ditches provided a way to transport logs out of the Swamp and drain it as well. The Adventurers soon realized, however, that the task of draining the Swamp was enormous and gave up that part of their plan to concentrate on lumbering. They cut much of the cypress trees for use in shipbuilding and the cedars for shingles and other products.

                    By 1796, Washington had become disappointed in the management of the Dismal Swamp lumber business and contracted to sell his 1/12th share to Lighthorse Harry Lee, father of Robert E. Lee, who never was able to come up with the purchase price. So Washingtons share passed on to his heirs upon his death in 1799.

                    Map is titled Dismal Swamp Canal connecting the Chesapeake Bay with Currituck, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and their tributary streams, by D. S. Walton, Civil Engineer, 1867 Courtesy of http://www.learnnc.org

                    Camp Mfg. Company, a predecessor of Union Camp, acquired all the Dismal Swamp Land Companys property in 1909. Lumbering continued in the Swamp and by the 1950s the last 20,000 acres of virgin timber were removed. In 1973, Union Camp donated its Virginia swamp holdings to the Nature Conservancy which, in turn, deeded it to the Department of the Interior for creation of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge consists of 107,000 acres of forested wetlands surrounding Lake Drummond, a 3,100 acre natural lake located in the heart of the swamp. William Drummond, the first Governor of North Carolina (1663-1667), discovered the oval lake which still bears his name.

                    Even though the average depth of the lake is only six feet, its unusually pure water is essential to the swamps survival. The amber-colored water is preserved by tannic acids from the bark of the juniper, gum and cypress trees, prohibiting growth of bacteria. Before the days of refrigeration, water from the Swamp was a highly prized commodity on sailing ships. It was put in kegs and would stay fresh a long time. People spoke of the magical qualities of the Swamps tea-colored water and how, if it were regularly drunk, it prevented illness and promoted long life.

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                    • #11
                      Thank you for the history lesson
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