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Well, this ought to cause a fire...

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  • Well, this ought to cause a fire...

    Was listening to a few outdoor podcast and there were some interesting thoughts, some similar but at the same time different.

    Most went along the lines at some point of - we can all argue what is causing climate change and hotter summer temps - but if you belive in conservation and the protection of wildlife resources, then you can't deny that temps in the summer have gotten hotter and longer in duration in many parts of the west.

    Some examples were trying to air dump water into various "watering spots" for mountain goats etc, and fly fishing guides shutting down once trout river temps get into the mid 70s because of the stress in fish. Some major rivers are shut down far earlier the last few years due to droughts and temps.

    What are your thoughts? And just know i will have a have trigger to delete disrespectful discussions and name calling in this thread. Keep it above boards, just state your thoughts. I know this is a highly touchy subject among different groups.

  • #2
    Just watching Lake Meade and other places, you can't deny thats its a drought etc., but like you said - debatable is how and why like you said

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    • #3
      It boggles my mind how out west (such as California) they keep talking about record low rivers and reservoirs yet they produce the most water intensive crops in the US, have massive population growth, and continue to siphon off water at record levels. I think the answer is pretty simple when it comes to water out there, whether there is or is not climate change (the earth has been slowly warming since the last Ice Age and will continue until the cycle flips and slowly cools... ) there are too many people for the natural resources to support.

      Climate change hits areas differently. Some northern latitudes will see more snow because of climate change. It's not like we are running out of water, it is just moved around this earth based on the climate. Humans are the only animals dumb enough to think they can outsmart Mother Nature and stay in one location permanently forever...

      Perfect example, the Outer Banks. Let's build permanent infrastructure on a sandbar. Bloody brilliant I tell ya.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by kickin bass View Post
        It boggles my mind how out west (such as California) they keep talking about record low rivers and reservoirs yet they produce the most water intensive crops in the US, have massive population growth, and continue to siphon off water at record levels. I think the answer is pretty simple when it comes to water out there, whether there is or is not climate change (the earth has been slowly warming since the last Ice Age and will continue until the cycle flips and slowly cools... ) there are too many people for the natural resources to support.

        Climate change hits areas differently. Some northern latitudes will see more snow because of climate change. It's not like we are running out of water, it is just moved around this earth based on the climate. Humans are the only animals dumb enough to think they can outsmart Mother Nature and stay in one location permanently forever...

        Perfect example, the Outer Banks. Let's build permanent infrastructure on a sandbar. Bloody brilliant I tell ya.

        HAHAHAHA some great thoughts in there, and wit! Its not like we are running out of water, it is moving - thats put in a way I havent thought about. I also agree that temps in certain areas are getting hotter and longer in duration and that it is having an impact - but like Brian said, we can disagree with others on why or how its happening.

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        • #5
          I've definitely noticed some changes in saltwater around here. Spanish Mackerel are thick by May and run all the way up to Cape Cod now. I've caught several pounds of white shrimp halfway up the Chesapeake Bay. Ribbonfish are everywhere. I hear about more ladyfish and tripletails every year. I catch trout and reds all winter long, and not in warmwater discharges. Sometimes I feel like I'm fishing in Florida.

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          • #6
            Man I hear you Bryan, I have had ladyfingers way up in the marshes in NC when they haven't shown up in the past.

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            • #7
              I don't really know what can be done....but times they are a changing that much is pretty hard to argue
              Make VAO Great again

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